“Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” A Reflection from the Gender and Development Network

October 2015

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are of course not everything we wanted; they are after all the outcome of tortured negotiations among nearly two hundred governments many of whom have highly dubious views towards gender equality and human rights. That said, the document just agreed by the UN General Assembly this month1 is certainly an improvement on the previous Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and a lot better than many of us feared. Glimpses of concern about inequality – or at least a desire to ‘leave no one behind’ - suggest some progress in the last 15 years and there have been positive developments in many areas. Specifically on gender equality, there is also some movement in the right direction. While the agreement of this document changes nothing today, it does provide us with some valuable rhetoric with which to hold governments to account tomorrow and in the decades to come. 

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Measuring progress on women’s participation and influence in decision-making in the SDGs: Recommendations to the Inter-agency and Expert Group and UN Member States

Measuring progress on women’s participation and influence in decision-making in the SDGs: Recommendations to the Inter-agency and Expert Group and UN Member States

July 2015

The GADN Women’s Participation and Leadership Working Group has published a paper setting out recommendations on global indicators on women’s participation and leadership. The paper is intended to inform the process for developing a global indicator list for the Sustainable Development Goals.

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Summary of positions on negotiations for the post-2015 framework

July 2015

While some important advances have been made, and must now be protected, the Gender and Development Network (GADN) argues that there are some areas where improvement is still needed. The paper is our response updated in the light of the ‘Final draft of the outcome document for the UN Summit to adopt the Post-2015 Development Agenda’.

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Post-2015 Working Group Propose Indicators for SDG Goal 5

July 2015

Members of the Gender and Development Network (GADN) Post-2015 working group propose indicators for the suggested targets under Sustainable Development Goal 5 on gender equality and women’s empowerment in the zero draft outcome document of the Open Working Group.  These reflect their substantial analysis of the Post 2015 framework which can be found at www.gadnetwork.org.

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Key Messages on Financing for Development from GADN

June 2015

In our briefing paper Making Financing for Development Work for Gender Equality: What is needed at Addis and beyond the Gender and Development Network has outlined how gender equality and women’s rights should be addressed in the Financing for Development Process. In this summary document, we highlight our five key messages in relation to the ongoing negotiation on the Addis Ababa Accord, and make specific language suggestions based on drafts to date. 

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Making Financing for Development Work for Gender Equality: What is needed at Addis and beyond

Making Financing for Development Work for Gender Equality: What is needed at Addis and beyond

June 2015

Throughout the Post-2015 process, many governments have successfully championed gender equality within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is now vital that sufficient funding is secured and that, crucially, this is of high quality and raised in a way that promotes gender equality and women’s rights. The Third International Conference on Financing for Development (FfD3) provides a timely opportunity. However, although there has been significant visibility of gender equality issues within the FfD3 process, there has been limited recognition that different sources of financing have differing impacts on gender equality or that gender biases within the economy continue to reinforce discrimination against women and girls.

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